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About the Philippines Free Press

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The Philippines Free Press dates to 1907. Its editorials and editorial cartoons, features, had a durable impact on Filipino culture and politics: Juan de la Cruz, the Filipino everyman, as a term and the iconic depiction of him, was created by the Free Press; the term “Pinoy” was also first used in its pages. From 1908 to the 1960s was led by its editor-in-chief, R. McCoullough Dick.

teodoro locsin

It was then published by Teodoro M. Locsin and then by his sons.

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Teodoro L. Locsin Jr., who succeeded his father as editor-in-chief of the Free Press, continues to write regularly in Interaksyon, and has a nightly feature, “Teditorial,” on ANC’s The World Tonight.

The following articles give insights into the history of the Philippines Free Press and its crusading editors:

“The bible of the Filipinos” by Frederic S. Marquardt, covers the prewar period.

80 years of the Free Press by Gigi Galang, gives an overview of the Free Press from its foundation, its suppression during the Japanese Occupation and Martial Law, and its recovery.

Mr. Dick, by Teodoro M. Locsin, provides a character sketch of the longest-serving Editor-in-Chief of the Free Press.

The Poet, The Fighter, The Locsin of Memory by Manuel L. Quezon III, provides a character sketch of the first Filipino Editor-in-Chief of the Free Press.

 

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9 Comments

  1. Joneen Nielsen says:

    Is this the same as Manila Free Press?

  2. Hutch Altavas says:

    I am looking for articles regarding Senator Jose Altavas from Capiz. He was a Senator from 1916-1922 then Congressman from 1925-1928 and delegate to the 1935 Con-Con he was the chairman of the committee of suffrage.

  3. Maria Teresa Ponce Sanchez says:

    I would like to know how I can get a copy of the Free Press issue way back February 19, 1955 where my grandfather, Manuel O. Ponce was featured “A VERY USEFUL MAN” by Leon O. Ty. Hope you can publish it in your archive so I can retrieve it. Thank you very much! God bless you always!

  4. Carl Salas says:

    I would like to get a copy of the article “It Isn’t Fair” published on Philippine Free Press on March 24, 1962. It featured my father’s accomplishment as an engineer who fashioned a machinery that allows 3-color printing. He received an honorary letter from the president May 16, 1962. My father passed away just a few weeks ago. We would like to get a copy that we can share with our family members.

  5. Laarni says:

    Hi all,

    Anyone knows where can we buy Phils. Free Press Magazine.
    Any issue will do.
    Appreciate your response.

    Thank you.

  6. Mr. Alfredo R. Geronimo says:

    Will it be possible to have a copy of your magazine or just a reprint of an article about The Phil. National Railways or MRR written by my father, the
    late Mr. Mariano E. Geronimo of Ligao, Albay. I am sorry I forgot the exact date of its publication, he contributed that article sometime in the mid 60’s.
    Thank you very much.

  7. Nina says:

    Hello to everyone! I’m a researcher for a documentary program here in the Philippines. Old issues of the Philippines Free Press are available at the Lopez Museum and Library in Pasig. Some issues have been scanned, others must be specially requested. Lopez charges PHP200/image for reprographic services, but at the moment it’s the best I know of.

    Good luck!

  8. Tess Bridgman says:

    I am looking for articles from 1952 on Mt. Hibok-Hibok eruption. There was an article about my grandfather Donato Requiron, Sr. Is there an archive I can look through? I can’t find anything before June 1952. Thank you.

  9. The PFP opened my door to a career in journalism….

    I embarked on a career in journalism because of my initial exposure to the Philippine Free Press. I remember my father, a school teacher who used to bring home in Lamitan Basilan, copies of the magazine when he collects his monthly salary. In fact, since I started grade I at the age of four and a half years old, I started reading the magazine at age 5. Fast forward to 1964 , my first year of teaching in the public schools. I used my first salary to buy a portable typewriter, a Teach Yourself Typewriting Handbook because I wanted to write for the magazine. My first attempt at writing resulted to a harvest of rejection slips. Somehow I found time to enroll in a home study course in writing offered by a publisher in the USA. A month later after taking the course and rewriting my previous rejected articles, I received my first money order payment of ten pesos for a published article that I sent to the PFP. On and off I submitted short items which bourhgt me money order payments on a regular basis.
    In 1976, I left teaching and got a job as a news reporter in the Department of Public Information (DPI) eventually transferring to the then Bureau of National and
    Foreign Information (BNFI) the mother unit of the Philippines News Agency. From the PNA I branched out to the private media to where I ended up these days. The DPI regional director said I was accepted in the agency because of my experience in the Philippine Free Press. Those were the days.
    http://felinomsantos.weebly.com/

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